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Floyd County was established in 1832 and named in honor of John Floyd, military officer and member of the state and U.S. House of Representatives.

In 1834, two weary travelers stopped to rest beside a spring near the junction where the Etowah and Oostanaula rivers form the Coosa River.  They and a third wayfarer decided the area was ideal for a town.  Its abundance of water, heavy growth of timber, and its obviously fertile soil favorably impressed all three men.

Following a night of southern hospitality at the home of Major Phillip Hemphill, the three men enlisted the aid of two others in developing plans for the new community.  Ferry rights were obtained, land lots and street plans drawn, and provisions were made for public buildings.  Legislative and legal actions designated the site as the seat of Floyd County and a city was born.  All that seemed lacking was a name.

Each of the five men wrote a suggested name on a slip of paper and deposited it in a hat.  Drawn was Daniel Mitchell's proposal, "Rome."  Rome's topography reminded Mitchell of the seven hills of ancient Rome in Italy. In 1929, Benito Mussolini traveled to Rome and presented the City of Rome with a sculpture of the Capitoline Wolf and her adopted babies – Romulus and Remus.

Rome, Georgia's Seven Hills

  • Clocktower Hill
  • Jackson Hill - (Turner McCall at Civic Center)
  • Lumpkin Hill - (Riverside Parkway)
  • Mount Avertine - (Lookout Circle off South Broad)
  • Myrtle Hill - (Cemetery)
  • Blossom Hill - (Behind Jackson Hill)
  • Old Shorter - (Third Avenue and Third Street)
  • The Clock Tower
    Marking the passage of time is Rome's most famous landmark, a 100-foot historic water tower that is crowned by the town clock.  It has been keeping time since 1872. The original workings, carefully preserved, still mechanize the clock today. Step inside the tower and wander through the Clock Tower Museum which outlines the history of this quite unusual structure.  Inside the tower, one may climb the 132 steps to the top to get a beautiful view of the city.

     

       
     

     

    overview
    Myrtle Hill
    Myrtle Hill
    ClockTower
    The Clock Tower
     
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